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Local interdependence: The case for small-is-beautiful earth-healing

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Local interdependence: The case for small-is-beautiful earth-healing

by Lee Temple  Last month I investigated the large-scale approach to healing global climate change.  We discovered climate change’s harsh reality, our 2015 “climate tipping point,” and the corresponding urgency of considering all viable approaches.  Let’s shift gears now and “get small” by studying the grass-roots perspective. Many of us haven’t fully digested our dire […]

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Water 101: The evolution of water use in the northern San Luis Valley—Part I

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by Marty Shellabarger Valley-born Marty Shellabarger, our county’s veterinarian—ranching 10,000 acres, 1000 acres of hay, with 350 head of cattle—writes this history of water use. The San Luis Valley, called the world’s most productive alpine valley, boasts less annual precipitation than the Sahara Desert. It’s productive because of two natural reservoirs, our mountain ranges and […]

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Appeasing the mountain spirits

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Appeasing the mountain spirits

A team effort delivers blessings to a dangerous high mountain spot by Gussie Fauntleroy On a chilly, windy day in mid-September, four hikers heading up the trail toward Willow Lake in the mountains above Crestone met at least two-dozen people coming down. The lovely Indian summer had evaporated, and by the time the four were […]

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Bitter Seeds: A tragic story of GMO’s

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Bitter Seeds: A tragic story of GMO’s

by Larry Joseph Calloway Bitter Seeds, a new documentary film on the shameful marketing of genetically modified cotton seeds among tradition-minded villagers in India, prompted me to appreciate efforts by groups like Shumei to restore natural agriculture in a hungry world. The film, not yet released, is the last in Micha Peled’s Globalization Trilogy, which […]

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Bears! Bears! Everywhere! Beware! They’re in our porridge, on our streets, in our trees. Oh my!

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Bears! Bears! Everywhere! Beware! They’re in our porridge, on our streets, in our trees. Oh my!

by M. Diane Bairstow In mid-April, a bear came to Amy and John Myzko’s house, tore through a 6’ electrified fence, ripped down their chicken coop and ate 15 chickens. After that it was quiet at the Myzko’s until the beginning of July. Since then they have had bear visits every night. Their dog sleeps […]

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by Keno Is the hole in the ground south of Crestone a meteor crater or not, and if not, what is it? Well it sure looks like one, and many geologists believe it is, but a few others say they aren’t sure. It’s a Crestone mystery that’s not completely solved. Known as the “Crestone Crater” […]

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review by Paul Shippee Is our world falling apart? Is anyone paying attention? You can learn the compelling on-the-ground facts by reading this new book by Lester Brown, founder of Earth Policy Institute (www.earth-policy.org). Who is Lester Brown? He is one of the pioneers and heroes of global environmentalism, according to the famous Harvard biologist […]

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The Old Spanish Trail—Tracking Down a Trail: Part 2

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The Old Spanish Trail—Tracking Down a Trail: Part 2

by Angie Krall (Heritage Program Mgr, SLV Public Lands Center) & Marilyn Martorano (RMC Consultants, Inc) This article is a continuation of last month’s piece on the Old Spanish Trail (OST). In it we discussed in broad terms the OST as a traders’ trail pioneered by Antonio Armijo in 1829 and congressionally designated as a […]

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The Old Spanish Trail – Tracking Down a Trail: Part 1

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The Old Spanish Trail – Tracking Down a Trail: Part 1

by Lorrie Crawford & Angie Krall, SLV Public Lands Center Native Americans in the San Luis Valley pioneered an extensive network of routes and trails for the purpose of hunting, trade and travel.  Spanish, and later other Euroamericans, traveling through the Valley likely utilized, modified and expanded Native American trails in efforts to locate water, […]

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Guru Rinpoche

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Guru Rinpoche

by Larry Calloway. photos by Patricia Kvill and Larry Calloway In Bhutan at dawn on the final day of the annual festival at Paro monastery, monks on a high balcony unfurl for a few hours an enormous textile so sacred it’s supposed to bring liberation on sight. The devout in traditional dress come forward to […]

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Thai-Lao

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Thai-Lao

by Larry Calloway Theravada Buddhism, not represented among the Crestone spiritual centers, is practiced in Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka. Under the non-democratic regimes of Burma, Laos and Cambodia, the monks in saffron robes are constantly watched, but they are embraced under the constitutional monarchy of Thailand, where I lived as a novice monk for […]

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Compassionate & graceful Guan Yin

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Compassionate & graceful Guan Yin

article & photographs by Larry Calloway For many of  us Guan Yin is a two-foot garden-variety goddess made in China, a sweet decoration out in the flowers. Now, imagine her 120 feet tall, cast in bronze. There is such a Guan Yin, brand new and shining, on the island of Penang in the Strait of […]

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The Whitten Ranch: Holistic ranching in the San Luis Valley

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The Whitten Ranch: Holistic ranching in the San Luis Valley

by Paul Shippee Out beyond ideas of rightdoing and wrongdoing there is a field, I’ll meet you there.     —Rumi Home on the range George Whitten, a third-generation rancher in the northern San Luis Valley, likes to read ecology books. He agrees that holistic, ecology, environment, ranching, and sustainable are all words that stick together to […]

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Grow local, buy local, eat local

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Grow local, buy local, eat local

by Thomas D. McCracken, President, Green Earth, Inc., Saguache, CO A new awareness of our carbon footprint brought about by global warming and high fuel prices has recently brought more attention to the issue of local food production and consumption. Here are some thoughts organized into five categories. Health Intuitively I think most of us […]

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On Quietude: Sound, noise & quiet & why it matters

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by Gussie Fauntleroy One morning before sunrise not long after we moved here, I was standing outside when I heard the faint crowing of a neighbor’s rooster, about a half-mile away. It wasn’t a generic, half-noticed morning sound; I’d met that rooster. He had a name, a personality and idiosyncratic quirks within the social structure […]

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Diverse mountain habitats support birds of many feathers

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by Keno Of all the many different kinds of wildlife that live in the greater Crestone area, our birds are amongst the smaller ones. So many people have a strong interest in them, in part because birds are the only animals that can truly fly—along with insects, and one type of mammal, the bat (flying […]

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Baca Home Tour 2009

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by Gussie Fauntleroy It was just a tantalizing tease of what’s out there, but the Baca Home Tour on Aug. 30 allowed a public peek into a few of the many Crestone area homes built with alternative materials, energy saving systems and creative, down-to-earth designs. The Baca tour was one of three offered simultaneously during […]

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A journey to China

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by Robert Demko In June of this year I spent the month journeying in China and Tibet with two separate groups, the first designed to see the sights of eastern China and the second intent on helping schools, villages and clinics in eastern Tibet with financial and physical aid. When I asked Kizzen about submitting […]

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What is the true cost of food? The importance of organic & local food

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by Cindy Cleary It’s tempting to save money on food by shopping at discount outlets, searching for the cheapest option. The rising price of gas, food and other necessities is taking its toll on strained budgets. However, is now really the time to sacrifice the quality of our food? What is the true cost of […]

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The noble potato: past & present and The potato’s virtues

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The Crestone Eagle, April 2009: The noble potato, at home in any garden or farm, from high altitude deserts and beyond. Photo from Chokecherry Farm in Crestone. story & photos by Nicholas Chambers Hailing from the South American alpine and grown for over forty centuries, the potato has been the staple of the peasant and […]

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Storing the Sun

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Storing the sun The Crestone Eagle, March 2009: by Nicholas Chambers In speaking of such feats as storing the sun, we are also discussing methods to bottle wind, yoke water, or cruciblize earth. Accessing the sun’s energy when it is not shining is a matter of modern alchemy—of tapping into the other living and elemental […]

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